Last edited by Vujinn
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

5 edition of Chinese and East Asian Economies in the 1990"s found in the catalog.

Chinese and East Asian Economies in the 1990"s

by Meng, Xin.

  • 142 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Asia Pacific Pr .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Economic conditions,
  • International - Economics,
  • China,
  • 1976-2000,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Foreign economic relations,
  • Business/Economics,
  • Economic policy,
  • Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsM. A. Guonan (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages190
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7888000M
    ISBN 10073151937X
    ISBN 109780731519378

    The book assesses the evolving experience with industrial policies, in the forms implemented by individual countries in the region, examines in depth how the Chinese experience meshes with those of other economies in the region - a dimension absent in the "East Asian Miracle" - and, the rich evidence from the s, casts new light on the Cited by:   In , roughly 1 billion Chinese people lived on less than $ a day (at purchasing power parity). The World Bank’s latest data (from ) show that the number dropped to million Author: John Mauldin.

    Business Networks in East Asian Capitalisms: Enduring Trends, Emerging Patterns builds on the foundational studies conducted in the s by gathering contemporary empirical and theoretical chapters which explore these themes in a comparative perspective.. The book includes contributions from authors working on the relationship between personal and business .   Since , when economist John Williamson first conceived of the economic and policy recommendations known as the Washington Consensus (Williamson, ), this Consensus became generally accepted as the most effective model by which developing nations could spur ing ideals of free-market capitalism, which included open trade .

    The Asian financial crisis was a period of financial crisis that gripped much of East Asia and Southeast Asia beginning in July and raised fears of a worldwide economic meltdown due to financial contagion.. The crisis started in Thailand (known in Thailand as the Tom Yum Goong crisis; Thai: วิกฤตต้มยำกุ้ง) on 2 July, with the financial collapse of the Thai baht. Despite these shortcomings, the authors’ wide knowledge of past and present East Asian economies and their fluent injection of historical as well as Japanese, Korean and Singaporean sidelights makes this volume a welcome addition to a literature that often portrays China’s contemporary economy as an autonomous entity whose past originates.


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Chinese and East Asian Economies in the 1990"s by Meng, Xin. Download PDF EPUB FB2

East Asia is the eastern subregion of Asia, which is defined in both geographical and ethno-cultural terms. The region consists of China, Hong Kong, Macau, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. The East Asian states China, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan are all unrecognized by at least one other East Asian encies: Hong Kong, Macau.

Chinese Economic Association (Australia). Conference (6th: Australian National University). Chinese and East Asian economies in the s. Canberra: National Centre for Development Studies, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

The economy of East Asia comprises more than billion people (22% of the world population) living in 6 different countries and is home to one of the most economically dynamic places in the world. The region is the site to some of the world's longest modern economic booms, starting from the Japanese economic miracle (–), Miracle on the Han River GDP: $ trillion (Nominal; ), $ trillion.

Speech by Jeffrey A. Bader, American University (9/6/05) China traditionally has looked to its neighbors in the East Asian region as the most important countries in Author: Jeffrey A. Bader. Posts East Asian economic growth Page 16 Young ( Ta p.

) repor ts a baseline estimate of TFP growt h of % for. Business Networks in East Asian Capitalisms: Enduring Trends, Emerging Patterns builds on the foundational studies conducted in the s by gathering contemporary empirical and theoretical chapters which explore these themes in a comparative perspective.

Rethinking the East Asian miracle (Vietnamese) Abstract. Initially, the intention of this book's work was to take a fresh look at East Asia's regional experience during the s and to expand and revise the findings of the World Bank's "East Asian Miracle", published in Cited by: Considerable interest was attracted in the late s and early s, before the Asian financial crisis ofon the so-called ‘developmental state’ theories which grew from attempts to understand the rapid industrialization of several East Asian economies.

The East Asian Model 1. the centrality of policy-augmented human capital; 2. changes in the size and composition of a country’s portfolio of productive industries are an intended outcome of economic policy ; 3. economic differentiation is a necessary condition for economic development ; 4.

democracy is not necessarily a precondition for. lessons for the East Asian economies, focusing especially on whether some of the difficulties that Japan has faced in the s and earlier can be avoided by East Asian economies in the future. The book assesses the evolving experience with industrial policies, in the forms implemented by individual countries in the region, examines in depth how the Chinese experience meshes with those of other economies in the region - a dimension absent in the " East Asian Miracle " - and, the rich evidence from the s, casts new light on the.

To avoid the usual eclipse of smaller East Asian economies, look away for a moment from China's reforms-induced slower growth and Japan's monetary blind : Dr. Michael Ivanovitch. Sheldon Garon, who teaches in both the history and East Asian studies departments at Princeton, is a leading scholar of his timely new book, Beyond Our Means: Why America Spends While Author: Sheldon Garon.

growth model that assesses East Asia’s growth experience from an international perspective. We demonstrate that East Asian rapid growth, in particular, can be accounted for by a mix of initial conditions, economic policies, structural factors, and demographic change that have characterized the East Asian economies.

The East Asian economic miracle that was justly celebrated in the s is now a distant glow on the horizon and countries in the region are attempting to come to grips with the realities of economic maturity,3 3 This is nicely captured in the title of a book also coauthored by Dwight Perkins (Eichengreen, Perkins, and Shin ).Author: Shahid Yusuf.

The book examines the effect of the IT revolution, globalization and the 'new economy' on the development of East Asia. The first book-length treatment of IT/e-business in the region, it questions whether the e-business revolution will renew and sustain the rapid economic development of East by: 5.

Eamonn Fingleton, a prescient former editor for Forbes and the Financial Times, has been monitoring East Asian economics since he met supreme leader Deng Xiaoping in as a member of a top U.S. financial delegation. The following year he predicted the Tokyo banking crash and went on in Blindside, a controversial analysis that was praised by J.

Cited by: 6. Asian financial crisis, major global financial crisis that destabilized the Asian economy and then the world economy at the end of the s. The –98 Asian financial crisis began in Thailand and then quickly spread to neighbouring economies.

It began as a currency crisis when Bangkok unpegged the Thai baht from the U.S. dollar, setting off a series of currency devaluations and. Book Description: Two Crises, Different Outcomesexamines East Asian policy reactions to the two major crises of the last fifteen years: the global financial crisis of and the Asian financial crisis of The calamity of the late s saw a massive meltdown concentrated in East Asia.

In stark contrast, East Asia avoided the worst effects of the Lehman Brothers. Rethinking the East Asian miracle: 东亚奇迹的反思 (Chinese) Initially, the intention of this book's work was to take a fresh look at East Asia's regional experience during the s and to expand and revise the findings of the World Bank's "East Asian Miracle", published in.

Five years earlier, such a broadside from a Chinese leader would have been unthinkable. Though in the s and early s China had used its soft power to reassure its Asian neighbors and expand.There currently is substantial discussion in the press and in the policy community about global economic imbalances.

Commonly accepted hypotheses for the root cause of these imbalances are: East Asian economies' export-led growth strategy, the self-insurance motivation for foreign currency reserve accumulation after the East Asian financial crisis, and China's exchange rate Author: Justin Yifu Lin.ment skill transfers; but unlike many other East Asian economies, China’s own fast and slow cycles have not followed the fortunes of U.S.

eco-nomic growth and recession—quite the opposite. Most recently, when the U.S. economy was in File Size: 9MB.